New Speech Pathologist Joins the HCRI Team

Hollins Communications Research Institute (HCRI), a national center for stuttering research and treatment innovation, welcomes Sarah Buchholz, M.Ed., CCC-SLP, a speech-language pathologist joining HCRI’s expert team of stuttering therapists.

Sarah Buchholz
Sarah Buchholz

Sarah brings to HCRI strong experience working in a clinical team environment. She has treated students and other patients for a variety of fluency, language, and speech-sound disorders. An ardent interest in stuttering and HCRI’s science-based therapy drew her to the institute.

“Stuttering is difficult to treat effectively with traditional speech therapy. I experienced this first hand,” Sarah said. “Yet, HCRI’s approach is vastly different and more effective than anything I’ve seen in the field. It transforms speech. When I heard about the open position, I knew I wanted to be a part of the institute’s work.”

Sarah received her Master of Education in Speech-Language Pathology at the University of Virginia (UVA). For her undergraduate studies, she earned a degree in Special Education Integrated Studies at Liberty University.

Sarah completed HCRI’s rigorous 500-hour training that certifies her to administer the nonprofit center’s advanced stuttering therapy program. Certification is required of all HCRI clinicians to ensure clients benefit from consistent, precise delivery of HCRI therapy and the highest standards of clinical excellence.

According to HCRI President Ronald L. Webster, Ph.D., “We are pleased to have Sarah on our clinical team. From day one, she has shown her dedication to HCRI therapy excellence and serving the needs of our clients.”

Sarah joins stuttering therapists Candy Smith, Amy Finch, Kristin Stanley, and Courtney Stackhouse in administering HCRI’s 12-day treatment program, as well as serving HCRI alumni.

In her free time, Sarah enjoys running, hiking, exercising, and spending time with her husband, Carl, and their two dogs. They also are devotees of UVA sports and activities.

About HCRI

HCRI was founded by Ronald L Webster, Ph.D. in 1972 to investigate stuttering through scientific discovery and treatment innovation. Virginia-based HCRI, a 501 (c) (3) nonprofit organization, has become an international leader in stuttering research and the development of scientifically derived therapy approaches.

Nearly 7,000 individuals from across the U.S. and 50 countries have come to HCRI for stuttering treatment. Clients come from all walks of life and include teachers, business professionals, athletes, broadcasters, engineers, musicians, students, doctors, military personnel, police officers, actors, a Supreme Court nominee, and even royalty.

HCRI is located at 7851 Enon Drive, Roanoke, Va. 24019. For more information, visit www.stuttering.org or contact HCRI at 855-236-7032.

HCRI’s Safety Response to the Covid-19 Pandemic

During this unprecedented time, HCRI is working diligently to provide the highest level of safety and Covid-19 protection for staff, alumni and clients at our Virginia-based stuttering therapy center.

Covid-19 Safety at HCRIEach day we monitor the changing Covid-19 situation. We continue to deploy best practices and comply with all requirements mandated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Virginia Department of Health (VDH). These activities include the following.

Sanitation – Our staff disinfects all work surfaces twice a day. This includes door handles, keyboards and mice, telephones, chairs, desktop surfaces and bathroom areas. At the end of every clinical day, our facility is thoroughly cleaned and sanitized by custodial staff.

Masks – All therapy clients and accompanying family members are required to wear a face mask when they are in our facility. The face mask must cover the mouth and nose. Our team members also wear face masks at all times.

Prior to Arrival – We encourage all clients to follow CDC and their state’s guidelines regarding social distancing and/or limited self-isolation (staying at home, limited public engagement) for 12 to 14 days prior to coming to Roanoke, Virginia for HCRI therapy.

Client Screening – Every day before therapy begins, clients are asked screening questions to confirm they are not exhibiting any key symptoms of Covid-19.

Temperature – We take each client’s temperature daily upon arrival and record it in the client’s records.

Tissues and Hand Sanitizer – HCRI provides tissues in all common areas, as well as in each client’s work area. We ask that every therapy client bring a small bottle of hand sanitizer to keep with them for personal use.

Handwashing – Frequent hand washing, by everyone, is emphasized.

Area hotels have advised us that they are following both CDC and VDH guidelines on housekeeping and facility maintenance. When you make your hotel reservation prior to coming to HCRI, it is an excellent time to ask questions of lodging providers about their Covid-19 compliance.

All of us at HCRI are focused on ensuring the safety of each person who walks through our door. We review the pandemic situation daily and are prepared to further respond to Covid-19 changes, as needed. At the same time, we remain steadfast in our commitment to continue to provide stuttering therapy excellence to every individual we serve.

If you have questions about HCRI and/or our Covid-19 response, contact us at 855-236-7032 or info@stuttering.org.

HCRI Announces New Online Services for Stuttering Therapy Alumni

Hollins Communications Research Institute (HCRI), a leader in stuttering research and treatment innovation, announces new remote support services during the COVID-19 pandemic to support the needs of the institute’s therapy alumni.

During this time when individuals are concerned about their health and safety, HCRI responded quickly and innovatively to promote the well-being of HCRI alumni, clients and staff.

Ronald L. Webster, Ph.D.
Ronald L. Webster, Ph.D.

According to HCRI President Ronald L. Webster, Ph.D., the nonprofit institute has stringently implemented guidelines set forth by the Virginia Department of Health and the Centers for Disease Control. In addition, the HCRI clinical team is now working remotely and continuing to serve the needs of HCRI therapy participants.

Dr. Webster added. “To extend our services and support during this most unusual time in the world, the HCRI team has rolled out new online services for alumni who are practicing social distancing or who are quarantined.”

ONLINE SUPPORT SERVICES

FaceTime Sessions
These sessions are tailored to each individual’s needs. Sessions may be scheduled for 30 minutes or an hour. Contact Holly Humphreys at 855-236-7032 or holly@stuttering.org to schedule your session.

2-Day Reset
This program allows individuals to fine-tune targets, while working individually with HCRI clinicians over a two-day period. Time will be spent reviewing and practicing targets, as well as participating in individually tailored transfer activities. Contact Holly Humphreys at 540-265-5659 or holly@stuttering.org for registration information.

Remote Refreshers
HCRI is continuing to offer its Remote Refresher programs for HCRI alumni. The Remote Refresher is designed to help persons recapture the ability to control stuttering, stay on target, and speak fluently in all types of situations. Participants receive an in-depth review of the skills taught during HCRI’s 12-day stuttering therapy. Online sessions take place over a one-month period. Please email Candy Smith at candy@stuttering.org for information about this program.

FluencyNet
HCRI’s online practice software, FluencyNet, is now available to former therapy participants at a 50% savings. Pricing is based on the length of the subscription. For information, contact Linda Booth at 855-236-7032 or info@stuttering.org.

Complimentary Weekly Check-ins
As always, the HCRI clinical staff remains available to provide free weekly support to anyone who attended HCRI stuttering therapy in the past. Individuals are encouraged to send an email to schedule a check-in call with a clinician.

HCRI CLINICIANS

HCRI clinicians are compassionate and skilled in the delivery of HCRI’s science-based stuttering therapy. While working remotely, HCRI’s clinical team continues to provide the highest standards of clinical excellence inherent to HCRI’s therapy delivery.

Holly Humphreys
Holly Humphreys

Candy Smith
Candy Smith

Amy Finch
Amy Finch

Kristin Stanley
Kristin Stanley

Dr. Webster added, “We remain committed to serving the needs of individuals who stutter, as well as continuing to work toward meeting the growing demand for online services while this crisis persists.”

ABOUT HCRI

HCRI was founded by Ronald L Webster, Ph.D. in 1972 to investigate stuttering through scientific discovery and treatment innovation. Virginia-based HCRI, a 501 (c) (3) nonprofit organization, has become an international leader in stuttering research and the development of scientifically derived therapy approaches.

More than 6,500 people from across the U.S. and 50 countries have come to HCRI for the center’s 12-day stuttering therapy. Clients come from all walks of life and include teachers, business professionals, athletes, broadcasters, engineers, musicians, students, doctors, military personnel, police officers, actors, a Supreme Court nominee, and even royalty.

HCRI is located at 7851 Enon Drive, Roanoke, Va. 24019. For more information, visit www.stuttering.org or contact HCRI at 855-236-7032.

Results Announced for Pioneering Research on the Effect of Mutant Genes on HCRI Stuttering Therapy

NEWS ALERT:  Roanoke, Va (September 12, 2019) – Hollins Communications Research Institute (HCRI), a national center for stuttering research and therapy innovation, just completed another research initiative in collaboration with the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The study is the first to evaluate stuttering therapy outcomes among a group of stutterers who possess one of four mutant genes for stuttering in comparison to a group who do not carry the same mutant genes.

Findings revealed significant fluency outcomes for both groups following participation in HCRI’s 12-day stuttering therapy program. At the same time, results suggested stuttering is slightly more resistant to therapy in individuals who carry a stuttering gene mutation. While dysfluency measures after therapy were similar for both groups, personal perceptions of fluency among the carrier group were weaker. The results of the study are published in the 2019 July/August issue of Journal of Communications Disorders.

HCRI has treated thousands of stuttering cases that range from mild to severe.
HCRI’s specially trained clinicians have treated thousands of stuttering cases that range from mild to severe.

For this research, HCRI President Ronald L. Webster, Ph.D. and his team worked in collaboration with Dennis Drayna Ph.D. of NIH’s National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD).

The two organizations have partnered for two decades on research to advance the scientific understanding of stuttering. HCRI was a member of the NIDCD team that discovered the genetic link to stuttering ten years ago.

HCRI stuttering therapy was used for the study because of the treatment’s quantitative, systematic methodology. In addition, HCRI clinicians have treated thousands of individuals who stutter with consistently positive results.

“At HCRI, we are in a strong position to facilitate genetics research because of our objective, physically based approach to therapy, as well as the large number of clients we have successfully treated,” Dr. Webster said.

HCRI research demonstrates that 93% of clients achieve normal levels of fluency by the end of their 12-day therapy. When evaluated two years post therapy, data indicates 75% maintain fluent speech. An additional 15% of individuals remain with improved fluency; however, they did not fall into the normal range.

Each group of stutterers was comprised of 51 individuals matched on age, gender and ethnicity. Speech samples before and after HCRI therapy were scored using detailed disfluency measures. Also, participants provided self-reported scores of their speech, based on perceived measures of struggle, avoidance and expectancy when speaking.

While therapy can be effective for mutant gene carriers, according to Dr. Webster, findings from this study provide a springboard for fine-tuning treatment when there is a genetic factor involved.

“We need to delve further into the physical details of speech, with emphasis on the carrier group,” Dr. Webster added. “Additional research will enable us to more precisely define the effects of therapy and may set the stage for customizing treatment for those individuals who carry mutant genes. And, we are working on that at HCRI right now.”

About Stuttering

Approximately 66 million people worldwide suffer from the effects of stuttering, with three million in the U.S, according to NIDCD. The condition is characterized by repeated or prolonged sounds, syllables, blocks and words that disrupt speech. Stuttering can impair social growth, educational attainment, and career potential.

About HCRI

HCRI was founded by Ronald L Webster, Ph.D. in 1972 to investigate stuttering through scientific discovery and treatment innovation. A 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, HCRI is a leader in stuttering research and scientifically derived therapy. More than 6,500 people from across the U.S. and 50 countries have come to HCRI for stuttering treatment. HCRI is located at 7851 Enon Drive, Roanoke, Va. 24019. To learn more, visit www.stuttering.org or contact HCRI at 855-236-7032 or info@stuttering.org.

New Research at HCRI Designed to Advance the Understanding and Treatment of Stuttering

Hollins Communications Research Institute (HCRI) is recognized nationally for providing advanced treatment for stuttering, along with extensive post-therapy support to alumni from across the country and around the globe. Yet, as our institute name reflects, research is inherent to our mission. We are committed to furthering the understanding of stuttering and how to treat the condition most effectively.

HCRI Research We continually work on the frontiers of knowledge and technology to improve the analysis and treatment of stuttering.

The outcomes of recent research include the rollout of our remote-access refresher program for HCRI alumni and a new children’s stuttering therapy program.

In addition, we have exciting, new research endeavors underway that are summarized below. Much of this groundbreaking research can only be conducted at HCRI. The scope and depth of our experience makes such work possible.

Genetics of Stuttering and HCRI Stuttering Therapy Efficacy

We have partnered with Dr. Dennis Drayna and his team at the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders to evaluate the impact of HCRI therapy on individuals who have mutant genes for stuttering and those who do not possess such genes. The research is now complete and we are awaiting publication of the findings. Once the article is published, we will be in a position to discuss the results and implications for our treatment of stuttering.

Quantitative Measurement of Fluent and Stuttered Speech

One of the great challenges with stuttering treatment lies in the subjective scoring of disfluent speech events. To address this, we are working on the first ever system to quantitatively measure and track stuttered vs. fluent speech through multidimensional acoustic analysis. Through the real-time scoring of critical speech parameters, we will be able to advance the effectiveness of both the assessment and treatment of stuttering.

These and other research initiatives are made possible through ongoing support from HCRI alumni and friends. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, HCRI relies on gifts to continue changing lives through fluency. By donating to HCRI, individuals help…

  • Fund important new research to enhance the understanding of stuttering and its treatment, with the ultimate objective of finding a cure.
  • Provide essential operational support that enables HCRI to continue providing life-changing stuttering therapy.
  • Make therapy scholarships possible for individuals in need.

Donors may designate their tax-deductible gift to be used for research, scholarships and/or HCRI’s operating fund. One hundered percent of donation dollars are used to advance the understanding and treatment of stuttering.

If you are interested in helping individuals who stutter through a gift to HCRI, please click here: Donate to HCRI >>

About HCRI Stuttering Therapy

HCRI’s stuttering therapy is a science-based, immersion program that teaches individuals how to control stuttering by replacing faulty muscle movements that give rise to stuttering with new muscle behaviors that generate fluent speech.

For 12 days, therapy participants work in a small group setting and are guided by specially trained clinicians who teach skills that help individuals overcome stuttering and speak fluently. HCRI’s therapy technology is used in the treatment process to help individuals acquire fluency with greater ease and precision. Therapy takes place in the clinical environment, as well as in real-world settings.

By the end of 12 days, research demonstrates that 93 percent of participants achieve fluent speech. Follow-up studies reveal that 75 percent of clients maintain their fluency skills when evaluated two years post therapy.

Watch before-and-after therapy videos >>

To learn more about HCRI’s stuttering therapy approach, call 855-236-7032 or send an email to info@stuttering.org.

 

 

News Update from HCRI … and How You Can Help Shape the Future

HCRI NewsWe have exciting developments underway here at Hollins Communications Research Institute (HCRI), including initiatives that will impact how stuttering is viewed and treated in the future.

As you review a summary of our news below, we ask you to consider giving a gift to our nonprofit center that will enable these projects to flourish. Our goal is to raise $125,000 by the end of 2018.

HCRI News Update

Mutant Genes for Stuttering – Research Initiative:
We are leading a study with the National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders that examines the impact of HCRI therapy on persons with mutant genes for stuttering. The findings may lead to an exciting new way to target stuttering therapy to optimize outcomes.

New Stuttering Therapy Program for Young Children:
We have initiated test trials on a new clinical treatment program that is designed to enable fluent speech in children. It would be terrific if we could bring this new method into our HCRI offerings and help children near and far eliminate the burdens of stuttering in their early lives.

Remote Refresher Training for HCRI Alumni:
We have rolled out a program for past therapy participants that enables distance refresher training via the web. While we do not yet have our 12-day therapy available remotely, we have a solid base through this effort that will lead to that long-term goal.

Scholarship Assistance:
We are once again working to increase scholarship assistance to young adults who want our therapy but who cannot afford to attend. The opportunity to participate in HCRI therapy can transform their futures.

How You Can Help

Please help us reach our goal of raising $125,000 by the end of the year. At HCRI, we are on the threshold of remarkable developments that represent new avenues to help more persons achieve fluency. Your tax-deductible donation can make a better tomorrow for individuals who stutter. Please consider a gift to HCRI today. Thank you in advance for your support.

To learn more about the important work we do, please visit www.stuttering.org or call us at 855-236-7032.

About HCRI

HCRI is a 501 (c) (3) nonprofit organization. The pioneering center was founded by Ronald L Webster, Ph.D. in 1972 to investigate stuttering through scientific discovery and treatment innovation. Virginia-based HCRI is now an international leader in stuttering research and the development of scientifically derived therapy approaches.

More than 6,500 people from across the U.S. and 50 countries have come to HCRI for stuttering treatment. Clients come from all walks of life and include teachers, business professionals, athletes, broadcasters, engineers, musicians, students, doctors, military personnel, police officers, actors, a Supreme Court nominee, and even royalty.

HCRI Alumni: Do you need to get your fluency skills back on track?

Join us for an HCRI Alumni Refresher or Target Tune-up before the end of 2018

HCRI Stuttering Therapy Headquarters
HCRI headquarters is in Roanoke, Virginia.

If you want to work on your fluency skills and build speaking confidence before the end of the year, we encourage you to participate in one of our upcoming Alumni Refresher or Target Tune-up programs. You will find these HCRI alumni programs productive and beneficial.

Alumni Refresher
October 22-26 or December 10-14

During this five-day refresher, you will join other HCRI alumni and engage in an in-depth review of the fluency skills taught during the institute’s 12-day stuttering therapy. Led by HCRI’s skilled clinicians, this program is designed to help you recapture the ability to control your stuttering and speak fluently in everyday situations.

Target Tune-up
December 17-19

HCRI’s Target Tune-up runs two and a half days and focuses on finessing target production to optimize your fluency. You will work on your speech in HCRI’s small group setting and benefit from one-on-one clinician support.

There are a limited number of spots for these program dates. Therefore, please contact us right away if you are interested in participating.

Next Steps

Holly Humphreys
HCRI Clinical Supervisor Holly Humphreys

To determine which alumni program is best suited to your needs, contact Clinical Supervisor Holly Humphreys at 540-265-5659 or holly@stuttering.org.

Holly will also assist you with registration and answer any questions you have. We look forward to welcoming you back to HCRI.

If you have not attended HCRI stuttering therapy and would like to learn more, please contact us at 855-236-7032 or info@stuttering.org.  We also encourage you to visit us at www.stuttering.org to learn about our science-based approach to stuttering therapy, see therapy outcomes, and watch before-and-after videos.

HCRI Stuttering Therapy – Now Enrolling for Fall and Winter Programs

Hollins Communications Research Institute (HCRI) announces new fall and winter program dates for the national stuttering research and therapy center’s 12-day stuttering treatment program.

HCRI stuttering therapy is powerful, practical and proven. Invented in-house by HCRI’s own research scientists, the nonprofit institute’s stuttering therapy offering is an advanced, innovative system that helps individuals who stutter acquire life-long skills to control stuttering and speak fluently at will. The 12-day behavioral therapy is an immersion-based program with systematic treatment protocols and proprietary technology.

In the past 45 years, HCRI stuttering therapy helped thousands overcome stuttering and transform their lives through fluency. Here are upcoming therapy program dates:

2018 Fall and Winter Therapy Dates
Stuttering Therapy Scholarships Available
August 20 – 31
September 10 – 21
October 8 – 19
November 5 – 16
November 26 – December 7

 

HCRI Stuttering Therapy Headquarters
HCRI’s stuttering research and therapy center is based in Roanoke, Virginia.

HCRI stuttering therapy operates at the highest level of quality-controlled, behavioral stuttering therapy available today. In addition, HCRI clinicians are the only professionals in the world certified to administer the therapy. They participate in a rigorous 500-hour training program to ensure the best possible fluency outcomes for clients.

Apply Online >>

For individuals interested in enrolling, simply complete an online stuttering therapy application on the institute’s secure website. The team at HCRI will follow-up with each individual to answer questions and schedule program dates.

Stuttering therapy scholarships are available for the fall and winter program dates for those who need financial assistance and who qualify. Information about scholarships will be provided once a therapy application is submitted.

More information about HCRI and the center’s advanced stuttering therapy system is available at www.stuttering.org. Individuals may also contact HCRI at info@stuttering.org or 855-236-7032.  All inquiries are welcomed.

HCRI Receives Major Gift for Stuttering Therapy Scholarships

National Business Leader Sander A. Flaum Donates $100,000 to HCRI to Help Individuals Attend Life-Changing Stuttering Therapy

Hollins Communications Research Institute (HCRI), an international stuttering research and therapy center headquartered in Roanoke, Virginia, received a $100,000 gift from Sander A. Flaum, principal of New York-based Flaum Navigators. Flaum is a sought-after leadership consultant, business speaker, best-selling author, adjunct professor at Fordham University Gabelli School of Business, and host of a weekly radio show.

Sander A. Flaum
Sander A. Flaum

Flaum has been an ardent supporter of HCRI through the years. The institute is a 45-year-old nonprofit organization led by Ronald L. Webster, Ph.D. Webster and his research scientists invented the first science-based, behavioral therapy for stuttering that imparts life-long fluency skills.

Continually enhanced with the latest research and treatment technology, HCRI’s 12-day program delivers among the highest documented fluency outcomes for stuttering therapy.

Flaum’s gift will be used over the next ten years for HCRI stuttering therapy scholarships to help individuals with financial challenges attend the institute’s stuttering treatment program.

“Sander’s support of HCRI through the years, including this latest gift, makes life-changing therapy accessible for those who struggle with stuttering,” Webster said. “His generosity directly impacts lives by enabling individuals to participate in HCRI stuttering therapy and realize their full potential through fluency.”

Flaum has spent his career leading and motivating businesses to excel and is recognized as one of the “100 Most Inspiring People” by PharmaVoice. He travels the country to meet with heads of business, conduct marketing workshops, and speak at conferences and college commencements. Yet, with his impressive public persona, no one would know that Flaum has struggled with stuttering since the age of five. In fact, his stuttering has been among his biggest barriers to overcome in life.

As a child, Flaum’s stuttered speech inhibited his ability to speak freely and express himself. Despite trying traditional speech therapy, as he got older his stuttering became increasingly pervasive, affecting him personally and professionally.

“People thought I was less intelligent or had mental deficiencies because I stuttered,” Flaum said. “There is a tremendous amount of ignorance and misconceptions that surround stuttering.”

While enduring ridicule and often being overlooked because of his stuttering, Flaum continued to push forward to achieve his goals. He was inspired by his encouraging mother who told him that “you have to work harder and smarter” to succeed as a stutterer.

When Flaum was in his early thirties, he heard about the advanced stuttering therapy at HCRI. He enrolled in the treatment program and found the experience to be transforming. Flaum learned new ways to use his speech muscles to control his stuttering and speak fluently at will. After he returned home, Flaum regularly practiced the skills he learned at HCRI to habituate his newly acquired fluency. The ability to speak fluently changed his life and enabled the business executive to realize his career goals.

After his experience with HCRI, Flaum became an advocate for others who stutter and made a commitment to make effective stuttering therapy more accessible. He started the Rose Flaum Foundation, named for his mother, to fund stuttering therapy scholarships to help individuals attend HCRI therapy.

According to Flaum, “Most stutterers go through a lot of adversity. The key is to not let it get to you. Instead, you have to work harder and smarter, as my mother always said. For me, giving my all and HCRI stuttering therapy made the difference.”

Working harder and smarter has become Flaum’s beacon for all aspects of his life. It has served him well and he uses it to inspire others.

About HCRI

HCRI was founded by Ronald L Webster, Ph.D. in 1972 to investigate stuttering through scientific discovery and treatment innovation. Virginia-based HCRI, a 501 (c) (3) charitable organization, has become an international leader in stuttering research and the development of scientifically derived therapy approaches.

More than 6,500 people from across the U.S. and 50 countries have come to HCRI for stuttering treatment. Clients come from all walks of life and include teachers, business professionals, athletes, broadcasters, engineers, musicians, students, doctors, military personnel, police officers, actors, a Supreme Court nominee, and even royalty.

HCRI is located at 7851 Enon Drive, Roanoke, Va. 24019. For more information, visit www.stuttering.org or contact HCRI at 855-236-7032.

How You Can Donate

HCRI depends on gifts of all amounts from HCRI alumni and friends to continue operations and make therapy accessible to individuals who stutter. Gifts small and large will make a difference in the nonprofit center’s ability to help those who stutter transform their lives through fluency.  Please donate at stuttering.org/donate.php. All gifts are tax deductible.

HCRI Announces New Staff Clinicians

Hollins Communications Research Institute (HCRI – www.stuttering.org), a national center for stuttering research and treatment innovation, welcomes two new clinical team members: Amy Finch and Kristin Stanley. Both professionals bring to HCRI excellent behavioral therapy experience and a passion for helping individuals overcome challenges.

Kristin and Amy have just completed HCRI’s rigorous 500-hour training that certifies them to administer the nonprofit center’s advanced stuttering therapy program. Certification is required of all HCRI clinicians to ensure clients benefit from consistent, precise delivery of HCRI therapy and the highest standards of clinical excellence.

As staff clinicians, Kristin and Amy join current clinical team members Holly Humphreys, Candy Smith and Courtney Stackhouse to serve HCRI alumni and new therapy participants.

Meet Amy Finch

Amy FinchAmy Finch came to HCRI after extensive experience serving as a clinician and director of human resources for a private mental health facility in Virginia. She is a graduate of Virginia Commonwealth University.

Amy was drawn to HCRI because of the dramatic impact that the therapy has on the lives of clients. She says it is so rewarding to see the smiles on clients’ faces when they leave the program speaking fluently.

In her free time, Amy spends time with her husband and son enjoying the array of outdoor activities that the Roanoke Valley offers.

Meet Kristin Stanley

Kristin Stanley

Before joining the HCRI team, Kristin Stanley worked as a psychiatric case manager at Blue Ridge Behavioral Healthcare. Her experience also includes serving as a social worker for a senior living facility.

Kristin graduated from Johnson University with a bachelor’s degree in counseling. She has a gift for encouraging people to achieve their goals, which she has applied throughout her career.

Kristin says the best part of her job at HCRI is watching the incredible transformation that takes place when clients achieve fluency and gain confidence with their speech. In her spare time, Kristin enjoys traveling and painting.

About HCRI

HCRI was founded by Ronald L Webster, Ph.D. in 1972 to investigate stuttering through scientific discovery and treatment innovation. Virginia-based HCRI, a 501 (c) (3) charitable organization, has become an international leader in stuttering research and the development of scientifically derived therapy approaches.

More than 6,500 people from across the U.S. and 50 countries have come to HCRI for stuttering treatment. Clients come from all walks of life and include teachers, business professionals, athletes, broadcasters, engineers, musicians, students, doctors, military personnel, police officers, actors, a Supreme Court nominee, and even royalty.

HCRI is located at 7851 Enon Drive, Roanoke, Va. 24019. For more information, visit www.stuttering.org or contact HCRI at 855-236-7032.